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Do You Remember? This work is considered exceptional by our editorial staff.

“Yeah, honey. I’m just leaving now.”

Levi Anderson held his phone between his shoulder and his cheek as he navigated down the front steps of Hill Crest Church, the Minneapolis sunset in the background. He lugged a rolling crate overflowing with music books in his right hand, carried a guitar case on his back, and clutched a travel mug of lukewarm coffee in his left as he spoke in puffs of white mist.

“What about the kids? Oh, sure. I’ll check. Okay. I love you, Clarissa. See you at home.”
He paused near the bottom of the stairs to shove his phone into his coat pocket and then made his way toward the parking lot. Near the front, he approached a green Volkswagen Golf, already surrounded by a myriad of instrument cases and other boxes. With a sigh, he popped the trunk and began loading his car, starting with the things he had just brought out.
The cold fall air whistled around him as he packed up all of his things. Reaching up to shut the trunk, he heard the soft crunch of footsteps. Had he forgotten something inside? Before he could turn or say anything, he felt something cold and metallic pressed against the back of his head and drew a surprised gasp.
“Don’t turn around.” The higher-pitched, but masculine voice had a forced sternness. “Get in. Drive.”
With a racing heart, Levi obeyed, inching toward the driver’s side door. He cracked open the door with a shaking hand and slid in. He heard the door behind him open and shut, the assailant also slipping in, as he started the engine. Was this actually happening?
“So where am I going?” Levi glanced in the rearview mirror as he backed out of his space and pulled out of the parking lot. His teeth clattered as he let out focused breaths of mist.
“You were about to head home weren’t you?”
Levi inhaled deeply, gripping the steering wheel with white knuckles as he turned onto the main road running alongside the church.
“About thirty minutes or so, if I recall?” the assailant asked in a suddenly conversational tone. “Strange that I still remember, eh, Levi?”
Levi no longer felt the muzzle of the gun against his head, but he still resisted the urge to snap around. “Who are you?” he strained himself to maintain a calm tone.
“You don’t remember me?” the voice whined. “Oh, Levi, I was sure you would remember me. It’s only been, what, fifteen years now? What a shame. You were so important to me, though.”
Levi’s mind started spinning as he made his way down the city streets toward the interstate. “Why don’t I remember you?” his voice was ripe with confusion.
The voice gave a bemused chuckle. “People always did mean so much more to me than I ever did to them. It reminds me of you and your siblings, actually. How are Caleb and Rebekah?”
“Just fine,” he replied tersely, making an effort not to react physically, but he was wracking his brain for any possible connection.
The voice laughed. “Do you still not remember me, Levi?” Then it became stern again, but this time it wasn’t forced. “Well, I better help you remember.”
He half expected to have the gun jammed against his temple again, but instead he felt the figure lean forward, his breath on his shoulder as he merged onto the interstate. In the rearview mirror, a sliver of his face was now visible, but all he could see was a single brown eye and dark hair. Still nothing.
“I was never cool enough for you to like me in school,” he began, his face to the ground. “I wasn’t athletic. I didn’t like Call of Duty. I was too weird for you.”
Levi was speechless.
“Remember that basketball tournament your sophomore year? You and all the other guys threw me in the pool in all my clothes and I had to walk all the way back up to my room soaking wet.” He took a deep breath. His voice was pained. “And then your junior year, I was in your room and you told all the guys I was gay because I didn’t want to sleep on the floor.” There was a moment of silence before he spoke again. “Remember now?”
Levi swallowed. Bits and pieces had risen to the surface. He did remember, but he couldn’t put a name or a face to any of the incidents.
“The same year, you convinced one of my best friends that I was in love with her. She stopped talking to me. The next week she started dating you.” The voice gave what sounded like a stifled sob. “Then at prom, you and the other guys got wasted and hid the bottles in my locker. Remember now?”
“I—”
“Do you remember?” the figure lurched forward, his voice cracking halfway between a shout and a sob. Levi flinched, his breathing heavy. “Do you remember me?”
In his current position, Levi could see most of the figure’s face in the street lights. He barely looked different at all. Same eyes. Same hair. Same everything. His emotion-painted face was just how it had looked fifteen years ago. “Isaac…”
“You haven’t completely forgotten me, I suppose,” he whispered, leaning back. As Levi wove onto an exit ramp, Isaac began rhythmically tapping his gun on his knee, the sound of each tap lingering in his ears.
“Isaac, I’m so sorry. It was high school and if I had—
“Your apology is a little late,” he interjected, suddenly composed again. “Not that it changes anything. You can’t take any of it back.”
“Isaac, you don’t have to do this.”
“I know,” he answered as Levi pulled up to a red light. He raised his weapon and Levi braced himself, squeezing his eyes shut and gritting his clenched teeth. He heard the gun click empty and then silence before Isaac spoke again. “But I would never stoop that low.”
Levi raised his hand to his chest. His heart shook his entire body as he exhaled. “Isaac.”
“I just wanted to talk.” His breaths were weak and labored. “I just wanted you to understand.”
Levi heard the back door open and snapped around. Isaac stepped out of the car without looking back at him. “Isaac!”
Just then, the car behind honked loudly at him. Glancing forward, he saw the light had turned green. Turning around, another car blared its horn as the first sped past him in the next lane, then another and another.
“Better get going,” Isaac murmured as he kicked the door shut, meandering toward the oncoming traffic.
“Isaac!” Levi voice cracked, but another car led a blurred curtain of vehicles that blocked off his view. “Goodness,” he muttered as he stepped on the gas. Looking back, Isaac was gone, lost in a sea of headlights and metallic sheen.
As the street lights passed overhead, he couldn’t get it out of his mind. The gun could’ve been loaded. He could’ve done it, but he hadn’t, even after everything. Yes, he had abducted him at gunpoint, but Isaac had shown more character than he ever had.
Levi sniffed and wiped his eyes with the back of his hand as he braked and turned onto his street. Pulling into his driveway, he sat there in silence, staring at the clock on the console. He had been right. Thirty-one minutes.
Sobered, Levi shut off the engine and dragged himself inside, leaving everything in his car. He flipped on the kitchen light and tossed his keys on the table, leaning back on a chair. He felt so hollow.
“Levi! Oh my goodness!” Clarissa’s voice called as footsteps clomped down the hall.
“Hi, honey.” He couldn’t even force a smile. “What is it?”
“Look what Kira mailed!” she exclaimed, handing him a thin shred of newspaper. “Everyone was shocked. I could hardly believe it. You do remember, don’t you?”
Levi could hardly speak as his eyes glazed over the words. He covered his mouth with his hand and tears spilled from his eyes as he could only nod his head and clench the clipping.
Bright college honor student, Isaac Stone commits suicide. October 22, 2003.



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This article has 3 comments. Post your own now!

MrAwesome said...
Nov. 5, 2013 at 8:34 pm
This is amazing. I wish more people could write like this and i wish everyone could see this because its really meaningful. If bullys or anyone read ths read this they would probably stop being mean for the rest of their lives.
 
jonahvenegas17 replied...
Nov. 6, 2013 at 9:56 am
Thank you! Bullying is an issue that's pretty close to my heart and I just think that people really don't understand the repercussions of their actions in middle school and high school, but it affects people for the rest of their lives.  Thanks for reading it! :)
 
screeeeenname said...
Nov. 3, 2013 at 1:39 pm
Cod wasnt aound 15 years ago.  Is the date at the end saying that isaac was not real? or is this saying that that was the date?
 
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