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Ice Cubes

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It was like when you were a kid, and weird little science things really got you excited; Something as simple as watching ice melt in your hand. It’s deteriorating, fading away, and it’s magical. Moving your hand forward and backwards, hardly able to believe that this thing is disappearing before your eyes, and slipping through your fingers. Then your mom or dad or teacher comes up and says “Do you know why thats happening?” and you shake your head, not taking your eye off the ice cube. It’s turning into more of an ice clump. “It’s because the heat from your hand is heating up the ice. That’s why its going from an ice cube to water” and all you can think is “wow, I’m doing this, I’m making this cold thing disappear”

Later you notice how lots of things can disappear: water disappears slowly when you boil it, bubbles pop, logs disappear when they’ve been in the fireplace long enough. But the ice cube is always the most magical. Its because of you that it’s going away. You can’t imagine the day this won’t be the coolest thing you can do. When you hold it tighter it melts faster, and sometimes shoots right out of your hand. Sure everyone can do it, but this one is yours. You’re magic.

Its years until you realize that ice cubes are everywhere. You’re living with them, in the bedroom next to you. Your parents, your sister, your friends. But you didn’t realize you were living on an iceberg until it began to melt; not until your parents started fighting, and your dad started sleeping at the office, and your mom started getting more irritated, and you don’t know what you’re allowed to ask. You couldn’t be the one melting it, it’s too big. One girl’s hand can’t melt an iceberg. Maybe its your body heat? No that’s not enough either. Maybe it’s them. Maybe their fighting made too much heat.

Icebergs, the colossal beings that brought down the titanic, have a lot to hide, and Icebergs don’t reveal their secrets to children; not even when it splits in half.

You used to bring ice cubes into the bath with you, rest them on your belly and watch them slowly melt into your belly button, the heat from the bath rising up, and the water droplets trickling down into the bath. Then you’d take another ice cube from the cup you brought and suck on it till it was gone. You once brought a hair dryer with you out into the snow to see what would happen. It wasn’t until now, that you realized, maybe you don’t want things to disappear.



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