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“You know, Smith, for some reason, I feel like I’m destined for something great. Like, I have this surreal feeling that someday I will change the world. It’s a little weird saying this to you, but I can’t just bottle it up.” Mark looked up the night sky and gazed at the stars. It was a cold night, a bit breezy, but the romance of it never evaded him. He shrugged at the moment of silence. He knew Smith had always been skeptical of his thoughts, even critical at some times; but for some reason, he knew he could count on Smith.

“You know I hate it when you say things like that. You can’t escape this town, Mark. You know that. It’s never good for you to think like this-- this town is your life. It’s where you’re going to have your kids, where you’re going to age. This is going to be your grave. You can’t escape Mark, not even you. I’m sorry.”

Mark thought of his ill mother. Yes, he couldn’t escape, but that didn’t mean he couldn’t dream. Or feel. “I know. But . . . don’t you think it’s nice from time to time to let yourself dream? Sometimes when I feel like it I write down these dreams of mine. I keep them recorded, so when I grow old I can look back and think: at least I dreamt.”

“That’s pathetic.”

“Maybe. But at least I’m holding onto something. What about you, Smith? Ever thought of becoming hero, maybe like Spiderman, and saving this world?”

Smith laughed. “I did when I was younger. Then I grew up, and that’s that. Why are you crying, Mark?”

“I don’t know, really. I just want some ice cream.”

The boys looked overhead and saw the sky darken. Thunder rolled like a great beast, and echoed the distances.

“It’s going to rain pretty hard.” Smith said.

“Yeah, I heard from news it’s going to be pretty brutal.”

There was a moment of silence as the two waited for the storm to come. The temperature dropped lower, but that was not a big deal in Alaska. Together, the boys came closer to each other and watched the clouds bulge with darkness. The wind began to slap on them, and then came the rain. They came like stabbing knives unto their skinny bodies. That didn’t bother them, either. They just didn’t care, for inside they thought of the conversation they just had, and the sadness it had caused them.

“I think we should go home.”

“Smith, that’s the best idea you’ve ever had.” Mark laughed as he stood up.

“Shut up.” Smith smiled and waited for Mark to offer his hand. When Mark didn’t, he pushed himself up and shoved Mark. The rain was hard, their feelings were too, but the smile on their faces, no matter how fake they were, were enough to end that lonely Saturday.



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