Life of Pi- the next chapter

December 27, 2010
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They say the moment before you die, your life flashes before your eyes. It does.
My name is Piscine. Piscine Patel. I’ve lived a different life from any ordinary child. One no one believes, but one that was worth being told. I would trade anything, to get the first 15 years of my life back- the time where I had everything. I was 16 when the ship I was travelling on sank. The sinking of the Tsimtsum killed mama, papa, and brother Ravi. I on the other hand managed to survive in a small lifeboat for 227 with a hyena, zebra, an orang-hutan named Orange Juice, and Richard parker- a Bengali tiger.

Sounds impossible doesn’t it? Surviving for almost a year at sea with me- majority of the time- being the only source of food, for an adult male tiger. At times, I myself don’t believe my story. There hasn’t been a day that I haven’t thought of my days with Ravi and the days with Richard Parker. I’d have to say I was relieved when I landed in Mexico. I don’t think I could’ve survived any longer out at sea.

I didn’t go back to India. It’s not that I didn’t want to, it’s that I couldn’t. All the memories! I know I’ll never be able to forget any of it, but to be there, to imagine the joy and eventually having to leave, it’s like suffering the loss all over again.
So instead off India, I headed of to Canada. I got a guardian. She fed me, took care of me, just like mama did.

I’ve been living in Canada for almost 65 years. I’ve never left, because I never felt the need too. I regret that though. The doctors say I have a matter of minutes left and now I wish I had gone to visit my home, my uncle, my friends; to see what’s changed.
I’m not ill, I’ve spent what seems like centuries on this planet, and it’s time to let go.

I met my wife at university, she was looking for books on wild animals in the library, and so I helped her. I ended up sharing my story, all the way from the beginning to the end. I can remember her very reaction when I told her about my days on the boat. She looked frightened to know that I had witnessed such terrible things. Ever since that day, the two of us were rarely seen apart.

I have two children, my daughter Usha, and my son Nikhil. They’re sitting beside me in tears; this is their second loss in the month. My wife left us a few days ago, and I can’t seem to survive without her. Like I said, we were almost never seen apart, when I was writing stories for the newspaper I worked at called “The Journal”, she would be next to me, giving new ideas for a topic or sipping tea and watching TV. If she were cooking, I’d help her chop the vegetables, as she dug up the kitchen in search for the ingredients.

I’ve faced the death of many in my life, now it’s my time to pass through the gates.





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