Mexican Heritage

January 4, 2012
By , austin, TX
The rich warm smells of Mexican spices permeate our house during every season. Family and our Mexican culture is an issue that is important to my family and I. Growing up with five other sisters and two little brothers there was never anyone not to talk to or play dress up with. There was always someone there supporting you. Both of my parents were born in Jalisco, Mexico; a small town near Guadalajara. The minute they were born they were immersed into the Spanish culture of family being first, and of course going to church every Sunday. The customs they learned as young kids they taught on to us.

I was born and raised in the small town of Richland, Washington. Everyone literally knew everyone. If you needed a cup of sugar or some milk there was no hesitation of going to ask your next door neighbor. It was that sense of unity that was so comforting growing up. I felt secure and protected there was never a line alienation and uncertainty. That close knit between everyone was what reminded me of my heritage of family coming first. My parents both came from large families. So we were always having barbeques in the backyard, Christmas parties, Easter egg hunting, firework shows for the fourth of July. Anything you could think of to get the family together our house was the place. It was two stories with beautiful Spanish stucco detailing a light cream and salmon color, flower gardens right on our front porch, and giant windows everywhere. It was my dream house, it’s where I was born and grew up I will never forget all the memories we had.

So then when my parents gave me the cold news that we were moving from our small town of Richland to the music capital of the world which is Austin, TX, my heart sank the unity and comfort I grew up with the first twelve years of my life was slowly diminishing. I was stripped of that sense of warmth and comfort and was being thrown into a world that was so foreign. All of the customs and cultures I was taught about from my parents was accepted, I as a person was accepted. And I was terrified that people would shun me because I was different. The way I dressed, what I ate was all influenced by my culture and how my parents raised me. Although, I was afraid of the unknown I was intrigued and fascinated at the same time. My curiosity and fear of what it’d be like was overflowing with questions- What was the weather like? Did people ride horses and wear cowboy hats to school? Did they speak with that infamous country twang in their voices? All of these questions were just waiting to be answered. When we got to Austin it somehow felt right.

I quickly learned that people were far from judgmental, they were welcoming with open arms they had that southern hospitality that was so comforting. I somehow felt at home, there were tons of different cultures melded together. I was fascinated to learn about a new type of culture but at the same time teach people about mine.

Concluding, an issue that is important to my family and I is our family and Mexican culture. It’s important because through everything whether it moving to a new city or just moving on to college. You know that your family, culture, and beliefs will be right there to comfort you. When it comes down to it family is all you have, they are your support system.





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