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A Boy and A Bobcat This work is considered exceptional by our editorial staff.

Most people who ask a little kid what they want to be when they grow up receive the stereotypical answers such as wanting to be a firefighter, policeman, teacher, astronaut, or anything else that is considered a usual response. My answer, however, was a little different than most. When someone would ask me what I wanted to be when I grew up I would proudly say, “I want to be a boy.” Before I go on, I feel it is important for you to know that I am a girl and have been my whole life. But wait, it gets better. When they suddenly froze up and had a look of shock on their face, clearly not sure of the appropriate response, I would takeit one step further by informing them of another aspiration; I wanted my first car to be a Bobcat bulldozer. Even as a child, I had no limits on my imagination and had no issues sharing these dreams with anyone and everyone that I met. Looking back, I am in disbelief that I made friends as a child – especially after making such bold announcements.
Needless to say, I grew out of the stage of that particular ambition; however, I am still the same big dreamer I was as a child. As a child, I believed that anything could happen and often found myself wishing for things that would be considered impossible or over-the-top. I still carry that with me today and never let myself deem any aspiration impossible. No matter how senseless or ridiculous I must have sounded as a little girl wishing to be a boy, it never fazed me or caused me to change from what I thought to be possible.I never changed my answer to a more practical career, such as a veterinarian or something that is normal and expected.Instead, I would look the person straight in the eye, smiling from ear to ear, and proudly say that I was going to be a boy. Even from a young age, I have not been one to screw a cap onto the bottle of possibilities or tie myself down to keep from failing. No adventure was considered too dangerous; no obstacle was seen as unconquerable.
I still see myself today as that little girl, jumping and twirling around, telling anyone and everyone she met about her ideas. This girl was not just an average, go-with-the-flow kind of person. This girl knows who she is and knows that she can accomplish the toughest of tasks. . She never placed limits on what she thought she couldachieve; even more, she never let others place a limit on her.. The child who was not afraid to speak her opinions or develop high expectations has become immutable. Although the hope for my future may have altered a bit, particularly the boy and bobcat part, my dreams have not grown smaller or become suppressed. They will forever shape who I am and what I will become. They cannot be concealed or put down, just like a wild child that dreamed of driving a Bobcat to school.





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