Reflections This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.

By
   For seniors across the country the ultimate countdown has commenced with second semester well under way, there are less than two months until graduation. This time last year I must admit I was envious of the upperclassmen who not only got to leave for summer vacation a month before the rest of us, but also were liberated from the public or private school system to move to the college of their choice, or work. It is at this point that the classic symptoms of "senioritis" developed. However, as time changes one's perspective changes as well and now that I'm faced with the proposition I find this to be true.

In terms of "senioritis" the phase is completely relative. Some people would never know it hit them because they've been in that state for as long as they can remember. For those in challenging courses, the thought of "senioritis" keeps them going until they realize there is no such thing. If you are fortunate enough to experience advanced placement courses, it is necessary to do the work, therefore, there is no breather. There was one important point brought up by our Calculus teacher everyone should seriously consider. Now that it is second semester and most people in our classes have been accepted to college already, it's natural to slack off. Yet next year we'll be kicking ourselves because it's how much we know that counts not how many advanced placement or honors courses that we loaded up on our senior year to look good for colleges. What is most important is learning and wanting to learn to better yourself.

As a senior it's just starting to sink in that my days at Scituate high school are limited. As a sophomore and junior, I couldn't wait to go - to leave Scituate. Yet as the final days approach I am swept with overwhelmingly conflicting emotions. The term bittersweet comes to mind. In a sense it's incredibly exciting to experience the college search but at the same time it's extremely unsettling to consider the proposition of leaving your good friends. For some headed to the military academies which begin in July, the college experience begins even sooner.

The biggest lesson for those of you who are yearning to leave your school you should appreciate every day you spend with those you care about. It doesn't last forever and before you know it, you'll be faced with the challenge of moving on to the another pond where you won't have anyone looking over your shoulder. The friends you've made will always be there, but it will never be the same after graduation so make the most of the time you have together in high school. v


This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






Post a Comment

Be the first to comment on this article!

bRealTime banner ad on the left side
Site Feedback