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Vocational School students

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Vocational schools are host to all different students from all different backgrounds, just like any other kind of school. There are in fact, however, certain demographics which make up the student population in a vocational school, given the nature of the school itself and the students that choose to attend. A vocational school prepares students grades 9 through 12 interested in entering a trade or career after secondary school, and though the spectrum of students that choose to attend is not especially narrow, there are conclusive facts and statistics about the nature of the students and their demographics.
Because vocational schools prepare students to enter the workforce after secondary school, the vocational schooling option is often a good choice for students who cannot afford postsecondary education or have a disability or other impairment which makes it difficult to continue their education on the postsecondary level. According to a report done on vocational education in the United States, public high school graduates in 1992 who were members of special populations were generally more likely than other graduates to participate in vocational education overall and in occupationally specific education, and students in lower socioeconomic quartiles and students with disabilities, lower grade point averages, and greater numbers of accumulated credits in remedial coursework were more likely than other students to be both vocational concentrators and specialists. The Statistical Analysis Report of Career and Technical Education in the U.S.: 1990-2005 also provides a number of facts about the demographics of students who attend vocational school.

Vocational education students are often male. The nature of the coursework is more “male-inclined” in the sense that the trades and careers offered by vocational schools are more attractive to males than to females. According to the Report of Career and Technical Education in the U.S.: 1990-2005, 59% of vocational education students are male. It seems only natural that more men would be attracted to vocations such as plumbing, electric, woodshop, and auto mechanics than females.

The race and culture of vocational education students varies depending on geography. Vocational education is often a choice for students of a low socioeconomic background, and, depending on location, those students are usually of a specific race. In a city, for example, minority students tend to make up the population of vocational schools because of the economical situation their families are in. In a rural area without much racial differences, the population of a vocational school will most likely be that of the surrounding area – Caucasian, African-American, Latin/Hispanic, etc., depending on location. The Report of Career and Technical Education reports that vocational education students are most often a population of students who has less-advantaged educational backgrounds. This population includes minorities, students with disabilities, students who do not speak English as a first language and students from a low socioeconomic background.

Students at a vocational school primarily speak English, but there is also a high population of English as a Second Language (ESL) students. According to Vocational Education in the U.S., limited-English proficient students were more likely than their English proficient counterparts to be vocational concentrators, which means that ESL students are more likely to participate in vocational education than non-ESL students. This is due partly to the fact that ESL students encounter problems in school, and prefer to enter a trade rather than continue to postsecondary education. ESL students are often children of immigrants, who chose to work to support the family rather than spend money and continue their education.

It has already been established that students who attend vocational school are often from a low socioeconomic background. Because of this, the home situations of vocational students usually differ than non-vocational students.

The family structure and composition of vocational students varies greatly. Students come from nuclear families and extended families, to single-parent, divorce households and foster care. Parental aspirations and hopes for the student is generally universally the same: for the student to become independent. If the student becomes independent, the student is no longer a “burden” for the parent or guardian, and in the low socioeconomic setting, a child who can support themselves is one less person to support within the household, leaving more income to support less people in the home.
Parents of vocational students are often times in a vocation themselves, with has both positive and negative consequences for the student. Negatively, the student must often monitor and discipline themselves, given the time that vocational parents devote to earn a living. The households these students come from range from traditional nuclear families to single-parent, divorce families. Vocational school students are often times also in foster care; the discipline and monitoring they receive is therefore limited. While household figures want the student to succeed and become independent, it is usually up to the student to monitor themselves and be their own disciplinarians when it comes to their schooling and education. Positively, however, vocational students have more of an opportunity to gain experience in a vocation if one or more of their parents is in a vocation themselves, which is direct at-home cognitive stimulation. Because vocational schools deal with everyday “real-world” career concepts, these students possess endless opportunities of cognitive stimulation at home (computers, tools in the garage, etc.).




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Espinoza25Cecile said...
Mar. 26, 2012 at 7:39 am:
Some time ago, I really needed to buy a house for my corporation but I did not have enough money and could not buy anything. Thank heaven my colleague suggested to get the credit loans from trustworthy creditors. So, I acted so and was happy with my credit loan.
 
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SarahVanS This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Apr. 3, 2010 at 10:15 pm:
Can't wait to begin student observations next semester!
 
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SarahVS This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Mar. 14, 2010 at 8:32 pm:
Huzzah for votech!
 
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SarahVS This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Mar. 10, 2010 at 12:11 pm:
Vocational education usually has a negative connotation and image attached to it... but doing this project really opened my eyes up to the reality of vocational education.
 
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SarahVS This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Mar. 10, 2010 at 12:09 pm:
At my high school, students who went to votech went for half the day, either in the morning or the afternoon.
 
SarahVS This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. replied...
Mar. 10, 2010 at 12:10 pm :
The whole county shared a vocational school, so students from other schools who attended votech would all be in one place! Interesting!
 
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SarahVS This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Mar. 9, 2010 at 11:56 pm:
Although I learned a lot from doing this vocational school project, I must say, I personally would not choose to go to a vocational school over a "regular" high school.
 
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SarahVS This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Mar. 9, 2010 at 11:55 pm:
I learned from doing this project that there are not only vocational schools that students go to along with their regular high schools, but that there are full-on schools entirely devoted to vocational education! The curriculum at those schools are really something! Perhaps I'll post that as an article as well.
 
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SarahVS This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Mar. 9, 2010 at 11:53 pm:
This project was a great way to learn more about vocational schools and what they can do for students beyond high school and into the future, whether they decide to go to college or not.
 
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SarahVS This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Mar. 9, 2010 at 11:52 pm:
Although I know a lot of people who went to votech in high school, I really don't know much about it...
 
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SarahVS This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Mar. 9, 2010 at 11:52 pm:
This particular part of the project was the "students" section, in which we had to highlight certain aspects of the students who attended our particular school -- in this case, a vocational school.
 
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SarahVS This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Mar. 9, 2010 at 11:51 pm:
With group work, I somehow always end up being the ONE person that takes care of everything!
 
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SarahVS This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Mar. 9, 2010 at 11:50 pm:
Group work tends to be the downside of things though...
 
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SarahVS This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Mar. 9, 2010 at 11:50 pm:
My EDTHP 115 class was awesome; we learned so much about different schools!
 
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SarahVS This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Mar. 9, 2010 at 11:49 pm:
I loved doing this project!
 
SarahVS This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. replied...
Mar. 10, 2010 at 12:12 pm :
It was sooo much fun!!
 
SarahVS This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. replied...
Mar. 10, 2010 at 12:12 pm :
And the presentation of it went over very well, also.
 
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