Blend Art and Fiction with Graphic Novels


Blend Art and Fiction with Graphic Novels

Your parents and teachers may have led you to believe that comics are for kids, or that they don't have artistic merit. You may have heard that they're a waste of time, or are only the same old stories about superheroes. In fact, the world of graphic novels is a thriving and literary world, full of great stories and artwork. If you like drawing and writing, you can try creating your own graphic novel. Graphic novels can often be serious, thought-provoking, and controversial. They can challenge society, present us with startling truths, or just capture real life. The advantage of graphic novel writing is that where words fail, images can complement and enrich the story. Check out these books that have used drawings and imagery to make their writing come to life!

Maus If you thought comics were only for light-hearted topics, think again! Maus is a chilling, largely biographical tale of the holocaust from the perspective of a son hearing his father's story of survival and tenacity. The catch of Maus is that the characters in the story are seen as different animals - Nazis as cats, Jewish people as mice, Americans as dogs, and so on. It's an unforgettable and unmistakably creative perspective on this horrific part of history.

Phoenix Series, Osamu Tezuka In Japan, graphic novels enjoy a lot more prestige and audience than in America, though they're rapidly taking hold here too. The grandfather of graphic novels is the writer and artist Osamu Tezuka. Don't miss his beautiful, challenging, often spiritual Phoenix series, which journeys into the distant future, the distant past, into space, and into many other dreamworlds. You'll be stunned by the imagination contained in these pages. And if you're interested in religion, Tezuka's Buddha series is a fascinating illustrated life of the Buddha.

Scott Pilgrim You may have heard of the movie Scott Pilgrim vs. the Universe, which got great reviews and was based on this creative, funny series of graphic novels. Scott Pilgrim is trying to date a girl - but her ex-boyfriends happen to be legendary super-villains who have to be defeated first. Check it out today!

Diary of a Wimpy Kid This series is for a slightly younger audience, but it's a great blending of writing and drawing for a new generation. It's an honest and funny take on life in middle and high school, combined with a clever use of sketches and drawings.

Seymour Chwast's Divine Comedy You've probably heard of the medieval work, Dante's Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso. But this artist has recaptured the classic story of one man's journey into hell and back as a graphic novel, with vivid, funny, and haunting illustrations. Don't miss it!e, but it's a great blending of writing and drawing for a new generation. It's an honest and funny take on life in middle and high school, combined with a clever use of sketches and drawings.