Beyond Vampires: Part Two


Beyond Vampires: Part Two

Looking for another good read in between issues of Teen Ink? We've got you covered. Twilight fever is still sweeping the nation, but we're guessing that you've either read the whole series by now or have actively chosen not to read them--so we've got a great list of moving-past-vampires book list for you after the jump. This week, I've picked out some great, creepy reads that will get your spine tingling, even without the (even Twihards must agree) overused vampire tropes.

Jane-Emily by Patricia Clapp: In 1912, when eighteen-year-old Louisa Amory moves into an elderly relative's mansion to help take care of her precocious niece, she's less than thrilled--she'd much rather spend the summer with her boyfriend. Soon, though, a few things change her mind, chief among them an infuriating (and attractive) young doctor and the spirit of a cruel little girl who died in the house years ago...and is hoping to find a playmate in Louisa's niece. I wore the whole cover off my copy of Jane-Emily, I loved it so much growing up. It was recently brought back into print, and I rushed right out for a new paperback to destroy with re-reading. It really is that good.

Coraline by Neil Gaiman: The animated movie version of Coraline, which came out a few years ago, is pretty good, but the book is about a hundred times scarier. Gaiman is a master of all things creepy, and he works some serious dark magic in this story of an adventurous girl who stumbles into a malicious parallel universe. This is a very quick read, but it will stay with you long after you put it down.

The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon by Stephen King: This is pretty different from King's usual fare, but it will absolutely creep you out nonetheless. Trisha is on a hiking trip with her family, but she can't bear to listen to them argue about her parents' upcoming divorce. She hangs back to get some peace and quiet, wanders off the path, and soon becomes lost. As she struggles to survive alone in the woods, signs of supernatural activity increase around her--but they might be only hallucinations caused by her growing weakness. This is one of King's more subtle works, with a focus on psychological horror rather than all-out monsters and murder.